Tuesday, November 2, 2010

Indian Mary Park

The Reservation was created in part, in gratitude for one of the local Indians, Umpqua Joe, who in 1855 warned white settlers in the area of a pending massacre. Thanks to Joe's warning the settlers were able to thwart the Indians attacks. Joe was allowed to stay on the land and operated a ferry for local miners. When Joe died in 1886, which is a story in itself, his oldest daughter named Mary and known as Indian Mary by the locals, stayed on the property and continued to operate the ferry. Not long after Joe's death, the area under the Indian Homestead act, became a reservation, thus showing the nations gratitude and assuring that Mary would maintain control over the property. Eventually she leased the property to the local stage line and moved to Grants Pass. The property changed hands several times and was purchased by Josephine County in 1958 to be converted into what is now known as Indian Mary Park.

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